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I am looking around at Trans ams, and I found one , I don't have tons of information about (not yet). But before I get too serious about getting one I wanted to ask this question.

I don't know hardly anything about mechanical work, but was wanting to get into it, I'm not looking for a car that I'm going to need to be doing a Ton of work on, but one that if something needed fixed I could learn on it.
So would you recommend a 92 3rd Gen Pontiac Trans am as a car to possibly take this position?
 

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Well your on the right forum when your in a pickle and need some help.

I did not know much at all but it helps a heck of a lot to have a friend or a coupe friends who actually have experience and not just "opinions"

Good one you,

couple tips,

If you remove a bunch of bolts, bag and label them, or screw them back in the holes you took them out of so you know where they go.

and KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN.

Take pictures, I have like 500 of this and that to use for refence when i pulled my car apart (got a little bogart with just cleaning this fender then the block then subframe got unbolted... so photos help)

Trial and error.

Goodluck.

DaveyK
 

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1994 Firebird Formula 381ci LT1 / TH400+GV O/D
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Welcome to Firebird Nation!

Probably need to clarify if the car you show in your profile is the one you are buying. Parts are still generally easy to come by, and the engine, drivetrain, accessories, etc. for the 3rd Gen (82-92) cars are shared with the Camaro. The downfall of many owners is the increasing sophistication of the electronic engine control system. They can be an issue if you aren't up to handling them. Mechanically, the drivetrain and suspension is not too bad to work on.

If the car has a manual trans, it would have the 5.0L TPI (tuned port injection) V8 engine, 205 or 230 HP. If it has an auto trans is could have the same engine, or the 5.7L TPI V8,240 HP. The manual trans used in these cars was a 5-speed Borg-Warner/Tremec, and it was not considered by GM to be strong enough to handle the torque of the 5.7L engine. You indicate a 6-speed trans. Not available in 1992, except for 25 very rare SLP Firehawks. If you happen to find one of them, the price would probably scare you off. Original list price was $39,995 + $9,905 for the "competition package" that added the ZF 6-speed from the Corvette = $49,990 total. And they have only gone up in value. The engine the car left the factory with is coded into the VIN, as the 8th position. "F" for the 5.0L, "8" for the 5.7L.

A Borg-Warner 6-speed manual was available starting in 1993, and someone may have retrofit it to the 92. A bit involved, but a great trans if you have one.
 

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By the time a car gets to be almost 25 years old there is no telling what condition it is in. If I was getting a 90's T/A I would get a '96 or '97. It would be an OBD2 car, but still around 20 years old. If you get a decent one that runs good, you can drive it and learn about cars as different things go out, but hopefully no major stuff or too many things go out at once. With old cars you just never know.
 

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Another good thing about the 4th gen birds is we have pretty much all the service manuals for the 4th gen cars. Factory parts books also. Only have a couple of 3rd gen service manuals to help you out.
 

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3rd gen cars are often over looked and though of as a sad time for Pontiac enthusiast. But they actually are not bad cars. they drive good, handle well and actually are fairly easy to work on.

As with any car that age, rust can be a factor. You need to look very closely at everything and make sure there is very little rust.

Best of luck in your search.. Be patient and you will find the right one.
 
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