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I read the first page and saw this post here..very well said.. i cannot believe that this post right here didnt stop this whole topic cold in its tracks...its absolutely right. its accurate , to the point and quite frankly makes the most sense.. read it again.. i am from ohio and now reside in mid -missouri.. i have lived along the I-70 corridor all my 40 years except when i was in the navy and stationed in south carolina ..i have found that in south carolina for the most part a 20 second warm up if even that is all that is required..however ,,up here in misouri and points north,,you have ta start your ride and let it warm up..starting up and driving off puts a lot of undue ,unneeded stress and strain on a cold,brittle and temporarily poorly lubricated engine.. its your money and your ride, abuse em if ya want too ..me i'll be warming mine up when ever the temp falls below 40 or so ... just my
How can you make such a claim when you haven't even read the entire thread? The reality is, the engine and oil are going to be cold regardless of how you warm up the engine, so its really a moot point. The question becomes, is it better to warm the engine up faster or slower?
 

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bike point of view.....

engine temperature and operating temperature:

the more high performance the engine is tuned, the more sensitive it is....
bikes are hypersensitive to this

there are several reasons why to warm....

ex: you must preheat the oven before you can bake the cookies...
ummm,,, ever hear... lick it before you stick it,, munch it before you punch it?
same applies.
its much more difficult to peal apart a cold grilled cheese sandwich.

for engines sitting for long periods of time, could/prolly be lubrication issues, thanks to gravity.
oil falls to the bottom.
if not mistaken, on the oil bottle, 10w40 means, when cold its not thicker than 40, when hot no thinner than 10.
engine, and oil designed around operating temperture.

again, all depends on design

generators designed to run at or around idle for hours at a time, most of its long life.

motorcross bikes, designed to run at wide open throttle for 20 mins at a time, short life

1. fuel mixture:
engine requires much more fuel to run when cold. i.e. choke/enrichment circuit
- starting the engine and turning it off, before operating temperature, causes rich condition making it very difficult on the spark plugs. the plugs will never reach a ''self cleaning'' state of operating temp to maintain life. repeated exposure resulting in premature plug failure
dont want to make it confusing, but a cold motor (specially carbed) is more prone to hesitate'' when you punch it, because its to lean while beyond/below operating temp range

2. cold seizure: piston to cylinder
the higher performance, the more sensitive.
engine designed around clearances and temp expansion.
ex. 2 stroke motors highly prone to cold seizure due to dramatic piston and cylinder expansion. the piston will heat and expand quicker than the cylinder, resulting in 4 point piston skirt contact to the cylinder. - not good- you may get away with this a few times, but then again, anyone can win the lottery. todays high performance 4stroke bikes, losely based on F1 technology (short skirt, light weight, quick rev) are very sensitive to this as well. resulting in severe cylinder damage and premature failure
piston/cylinder is the most typical damaged when cold, but not limited to, everything that turns has a designed operating temp.
your older motors, with worn clearances of course are not as sensitive, well to anything really...

basicly, metals change size with heat, so its best we give them time to change before we pin it.
those are the main issues that come to mind.
 

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Discussion Starter · #63 ·
engine temperature and operating temperature:

the more high performance the engine is tuned, the more sensitive it is....
bikes are hypersensitive to this

there are several reasons why to warm....
IThe car warms up either way, the question is, is it better to have it warm up fast or to let it run longer while cold.

ex: you must preheat the oven before you can bake the cookies...
ummm,,, ever hear... lick it before you stick it,, munch it before you punch it?
same applies.
its much more difficult to peal apart a cold grilled cheese sandwich.
These are very poor examples to say the least. What do any of the above have in common with an internal combustion engine??

for engines sitting for long periods of time, could/prolly be lubrication issues, thanks to gravity.
oil falls to the bottom.
if not mistaken, on the oil bottle, 10w40 means, when cold its not thicker than 40, when hot no thinner than 10.
engine, and oil designed around operating temperture.
But, the oil pump pumps the oil to the top of the engine, and since it varies with engine speed, the higher the RPM the more oil which is pumped to the top of the engine.

again, all depends on design

generators designed to run at or around idle for hours at a time, most of its long life.

motorcross bikes, designed to run at wide open throttle for 20 mins at a time, short life

1. fuel mixture:
engine requires much more fuel to run when cold. i.e. choke/enrichment circuit
- starting the engine and turning it off, before operating temperature, causes rich condition making it very difficult on the spark plugs. the plugs will never reach a ''self cleaning'' state of operating temp to maintain life. repeated exposure resulting in premature plug failure
dont want to make it confusing, but a cold motor (specially carbed) is more prone to hesitate'' when you punch it, because its to lean while beyond/below operating temp range
The engine is going to be cold when you start it regardless, the question is, do you want the engine to warm up fast, or do you want it to warm up slow.

2. cold seizure: piston to cylinder
the higher performance, the more sensitive.
engine designed around clearances and temp expansion.
ex. 2 stroke motors highly prone to cold seizure due to dramatic piston and cylinder expansion. the piston will heat and expand quicker than the cylinder, resulting in 4 point piston skirt contact to the cylinder. - not good- you may get away with this a few times, but then again, anyone can win the lottery. todays high performance 4stroke bikes, losely based on F1 technology (short skirt, light weight, quick rev) are very sensitive to this as well. resulting in severe cylinder damage and premature failure
piston/cylinder is the most typical damaged when cold, but not limited to, everything that turns has a designed operating temp.
your older motors, with worn clearances of course are not as sensitive, well to anything really...

basicly, metals change size with heat, so its best we give them time to change before we pin it.
those are the main issues that come to mind.
Are we talking moto cross bikes or cars? In addition, nobody is advocating driving a car hard while the engine is cold.
 

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transmission?

just idling, im not sure how much heat it would produce, but some
with the engine running, trans in neutral, clutch released-
the imput shaft would be spinning with the crankshaft.
 
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