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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello ,

This is my first post. Let me introduce my self. I used to have a wonderful 1968 Firebird Convertible ,loved it but sold it many moons ago. Now days, I m in the market for a 1975-1977 Trans Am and after browsing the internet I realized that the price really varies from one seller to another ,one option to another etc so I m having a really hard putting a real street value on a car.

Where can I find some info? Please accept my apology is that type of topic has been asked before.

Yesterday, I came across a 1975 400. 6.6L .4 bbl in all original and matching number condition, though it had a repaint in the original color. The car has 50 k the seller wants 19 k ,original interior automatic...

Is it a good price?

Thank you

Terry
 

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There are too far too many variables here to put a solid price on any classic car.

The best way to value a car is to give it a very good look over. How much rust can you find. Look into and under things. How rare of a model is it? What history does it have? how well does it drive?

You say this one is very original. Will it need any restoration? How good are the rubber parts? Bushings? Brake lines? Fuel tank and lines? Motor mounts? Cooling system?

After you go over every little thing, then you must decide what you are willing to pay for the car. Be realistic and base it on what cars near that condition seem to be selling for. Not what people are asking, but what they are really selling for.

If you ask me, unless that car has been basically museum kept, it likely needs some work or will soon need some work if you plan on using it on the road. Based on that, you have to figure how much you are willing to put into the car after you buy it.

Fresh paint can hide a lot of things. How long ago was it painted? If not too long ago, then be concerned about how any rust was repaired.

Take your time when shopping for an old car.

Best wishes in your search. I know you will find the right one.
 

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Being in CA be VERY carefull that it can be smoged!Im sure 75s have to.I have a friend that had to take his out of state to sell it as he could not get it done.In 40 years many have had the emissions required stuff removed.You better off with a earlier year car that is exempt. Tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
There are too far too many variables here to put a solid price on any classic car.

The best way to value a car is to give it a very good look over. How much rust can you find. Look into and under things. How rare of a model is it? What history does it have? how well does it drive?

You say this one is very original. Will it need any restoration? How good are the rubber parts? Bushings? Brake lines? Fuel tank and lines? Motor mounts? Cooling system?

After you go over every little thing, then you must decide what you are willing to pay for the car. Be realistic and base it on what cars near that condition seem to be selling for. Not what people are asking, but what they are really selling for.

If you ask me, unless that car has been basically museum kept, it likely needs some work or will soon need some work if you plan on using it on the road. Based on that, you have to figure how much you are willing to put into the car after you buy it.

Fresh paint can hide a lot of things. How long ago was it painted? If not too long ago, then be concerned about how any rust was repaired.

Take your time when shopping for an old car.

Best wishes in your search. I know you will find the right one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
thank you so much for the replies.

i read about Trans Ams going up in value so a lot of sellers on Ebay and other sites are taking that opportunity to jack up the prices. How ever after doing a little research i noticed that many of those cars have been for sale for one a month and beyond. So is the price increase really working or is it just another internet thing?

I still need to know the street value of a car before buying it. Could you recommend a link?
 

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No link exists. Too many options and years and condition to make a basis. The increasing value is marketing by the seller. You'll still spend 5x the value to restore one.
 
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