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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
94 Transam…So when I got my new 18inch wheels and tires the max amt of ppl that could be in my car was two. I got Stranos springs and koni oranges and now I can’t even have my wife in the car and it even scrapes on the right rear passenger side with just me on uneven roads.
Wheels and tires are 18x9.5 all around +35 offset.
I noticed my tire is obtaining damage now. I got an adjustable founders panhard bar after lowering the car and the car looks uneven still. The shop that installed it said that’s the best they could do with that bar? (Unless they did it wrong)
What are my options aside from new wheels/tires ? Or am I screwed.

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1994 Firebird Formula 381ci LT1 / TH400+GV O/D
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Is the panhard rod “adjustable”? What size is the tire? Has the rear of the car ever been hit, or the tire slammed hard into a curb?

You have to adjust the panhard rod so the outer edge of the tire is just inside the lip of the fender, ON BOTH SIDES. That's the best you can do with a 35mm offset. You would have been better off with +45mm or larger offset.

Then you will have to “roll” the inner edge of the fender lip sheet metal. Right now the horizontal lip is cutting the edge of the tire. Bend the lip up to at least a 45° angle. It’s still going to sit down on the tire with a heavy load in the back, but minimize cutting the tire. Maybe consider a taller bump stop.

Basically, you bought the wrong wheels. Then you made it worse by lowering the car. My 11” wide rear wheels with 315 tires actually stick out 1/8” more then yours, and with careful adjustment of the panhard rod and rolling the fender lip, and not lowered, they never rub.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Is the panhard rod “adjustable”? What size is the tire? Has the rear of the car ever been hit, or the tire slammed hard into a curb?

You have to adjust the panhard rod so the outer edge of the tire is just inside the lip of the fender, ON BOTH SIDES. That's the best you can do with a 35mm offset. You would have been better off with +45mm or larger offset.

Then you will have to “roll” the inner edge of the fender lip sheet metal. Right now the horizontal lip is cutting the edge of the tire. Bend the lip up to at least a 45° angle. It’s still going to sit down on the tire with a heavy load in the back, but minimize cutting the tire. Maybe consider a taller bump stop.

Basically, you bought the wrong wheels. Then you made it worse by lowering the car. My 11” wide rear wheels with 315 tires actually stick out 1/8” more then yours, and with careful adjustment of the panhard rod and rolling the fender lip, and not lowered, they never rub.
I spoke to Stranos prior to getting the lowering springs and he figured I would’ve been fine even with my wheel/tire setup. I was a bit hesitant but I went with it. Little disappointed I rub but I do love the stance tho. Might go back to stock when I add LTH if I scrape real bad.
So, I noticed my bump stops are gone so I will be installing some of Stranos bump stops tomorrow in hopes that it will help with rubbing.
That’s the panhard bar I got. Idk but I feel the shop didn’t install it correctly as when I took the car for the shocks/springs I told them to install my bar and they said “a what ?” like they didn’t know what it was for (I had to explain). I read many members have this bar and it did the job. When I got the car, the rear sticks more towards the driver side so I told the shop if they adjusted the bar correctly and the guy said that’s as far as it goes and that I should’ve gotten and adjustable one???? But it is adjustable ??? Idk did i do something wrong here ?
I’ve had the car a year and it hasn’t been an accident that im aware of previously. Prior to lowering it was a bit more centered.

thanks injuneer for your time
 

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1994 Firebird Formula 381ci LT1 / TH400+GV O/D
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The problem with a “single adjustable“ bar is that you have to take the bolt out of the adjustable end, screw the end of the rod in or out until it is the correct length, put it back on with the bolt, and hope you got it right. Do over if not right. A double adjustable allows you to turn the bar with both ends still bolted in place. Both methods obviously work, but the double adjustable is easier to adjust.

Looking at the rear of the car, making the bar longer moves the body to the right. That would make the driver side wheel stick out more. Shortening the bar moves the body to the left, making the passenger side wheel stick out more.

Measure the horizontal distance between the edge of the fender and the edge of the tire, using the same points on both side of the car. Subtract the smaller distance from the larger distance. Divide the resulting difference by 2. That's how much you have to lengthen or shorten the bar. After you are done, measure the spacing on each side to make sure they are equal.

It's possible, if the rear of the car has been hit, or a rear wheel has hit a curb hard, that the panhard rod support arm on the passenger side has been bent enough that there isn’t enough range of adjustment in the panhard rod.

They make a bump stop with extra height to limit how far the rear of the car can drop.


Expensive, and you will feel the thump if you have enough weight in the back to bottom it out on a hard bump.

You should still roll the inner edge of the fender lip.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The problem with a “single adjustable“ bar is that you have to take the bolt out of the adjustable end, screw the end of the rod in or out until it is the correct length, put it back on with the bolt, and hope you got it right. Do over if not right. A double adjustable allows you to turn the bar with both ends still bolted in place. Both methods obviously work, but the double adjustable is easier to adjust.

Looking at the rear of the car, making the bar longer moves the body to the right. That would make the driver side wheel stick out more. Shortening the bar moves the body to the left, making the passenger side wheel stick out more.

Measure the horizontal distance between the edge of the fender and the edge of the tire, using the same points on both side of the car. Subtract the smaller distance from the larger distance. Divide the resulting difference by 2. That's how much you have to lengthen or shorten the bar. After you are done, measure the spacing on each side to make sure they are equal.

It's possible, if the rear of the car has been hit, or a rear wheel has hit a curb hard, that the panhard rod support arm on the passenger side has been bent enough that there isn’t enough range of adjustment in the panhard rod.

They make a bump stop with extra height to limit how far the rear of the car can drop.


Expensive, and you will feel the thump if you have enough weight in the back to bottom it out on a hard bump.

You should still roll the inner edge of the fender lip.
Ok so I think they probably didn’t take the bolt out of the adjustable end. They kind of had an attitude when I told them what the bar was lol. Man I wish I knew how to do it myself.

Car looks crooked smh I’ll find a performance shop to see if they can adjust it and get those fenders rolled.

I bought these. I’ll install them later. Better than no bump stops lol
 

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Fred has told you how to adjust the panhard rod. Might be wise to invest in a few tools and at least try to fix the problem. I think in your case the car will need to be jacked up and support the car at the frame rails so the rear end is free to move back and forth. Just looked at my panhard rod and if there are no threads showing in the adjustment the rear end would be sticking out the passenger side of car. Not sure but looks to me like yours is further out on the driver’s side. You can at least see if the shop that did the work knew what they were talking about. If you still see threads there is still some adjusting that can be done. As far as tools go, try your local pawn shops for a set of combination wrenches. You’ll need a lot more than just those but a set of jack stands, a floor jack and the right size wrenches will save you the cost of a shop bill. (make sure you do the work on a hard level surface with the front wheels blocked in front and back so the car doesn’t fall off the jacks or stands) Then if you don’t feel comfortable with rolling the fenders take it to a body shop that will agree to rolling them for you.
Get some first hand experience and find another way to enjoy your car by learning how to maintain it as you can. You’ve already made a good start by joining fbn and participating in the conversations!
 

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1994 Firebird Formula 381ci LT1 / TH400+GV O/D
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This ^ ^ ^ ^

The more work you do yourself, the more you will learn about the car and how the parts work together.

 
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