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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Please excuse my lack of knowledge here, but I have a question in relation to brakes...

I have a 98 Firebird Formula and I'm researching into improvements I can make to the brakes.

I can see that there are plenty of third party disc brake rotors on the market, even here in Australia... and they are pretty cheap.

But what I don't know is :

1. Will the dimpled/slotted rotors give me better braking?

2. I've seen some RDA/EBC brakes for sale at a good price:

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/2-Front-Dimpled-Slotted-Disc-Brake-Rotors-Pontiac-FIREBIRD-TRANSAM-98-On-/221955215266?hash=item33ad8fcfa2:g:u1kAAOSwFqJWlyul

3. do they work with stock pads?

4. Will they chew up brake pads quicker than normal rotors?

5. Is there much point in just doing front, or should both front and back be done?

6. If these are a good replacement solution, how much work is involved in replacement?

Note: this car is not for racing or track, just looking for more confidence in the brakes.
 

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Ramblin' Wreck
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5,083 Posts
I can't answer most of the questions but:

4. Yes

6. Not bad. Once the wheel is removed, slightly compress the caliper pistons with a large c-clamp. Then use a 13mm socket to remove the upper caliper-to-mounting plate bolt and swing out and down the caliper, exposing the pads. Swap pads and swing back up the caliper. Put back the bolt and you are done.

To change rotors, you remove the two 18mm socket head bolts holding the caliper mount to the spindle and pull it out and hang it out of the way temporarily while you swap rotors.

While you are at it, it's usually a good idea to replace the grease in the caliper slide/guide pins. Or at least inspect for free movement.

Note: I just did mine yesterday and found that the AC Delco clips at each end of the pads were made too large and scraped on the rotors. I had to reuse the old ones.
 

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1. It doesn't really matter for the street, but replacing your pads and rotors alone will give you better stopping power.

2. I am not familiar with that brand. Do your research, but if you are going for inexpensive rotors don't be surprised if you find a brand that makes TERRIBLE rotors.

3. If you purchase the rotors that are designed for your vehicle, than yes, they will fit stock calipers and stock pads.

4. Usually, depending on how much of a lead foot you are.

5. Front take most of the braking force, mostly because a proportioning valve to keep your rears from locking up to quick. If you are going to replace any, do the front's. Then do the rears whenever the rear brakes need done.

6. Gary basically spelled this one out already.

before Wheel Tire Automotive tire Locking hubs Motor vehicle and after Wheel Tire Automotive tire Locking hubs Vehicle brake
 

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Ramblin' Wreck
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Change my statement from "...slightly compress the caliper pistons" to "...completely compress the caliper pistons". That is needed if you are changing pads. I was just changing calipers.
 
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